Scouting is patriotic, not political.

You can’t escape hearing about the race for the White House, no matter how hard you try. The recent speeches and interviews that have spilled from the podiums in Iowa and New Hampshire are filling the airwaves, leading the headlines, and populating Twitter accounts from coast to coast and around the world. Yes, my friends, as Scouting prepares for a change in its national leadership in 2012, our country prepares to vote on its own leadership.

I like to think that Scouting plays an important part in our electoral process.

Simply put, I look at Scouting’s role as being patriotic, not political. We, at the BSA, are the role models for responsible citizenship, so it’s incumbent upon us to encourage our adult Scouters to set a great example by getting out to the polls.

At the same time, as the poster children for responsible citizenship, we also need to be individually engaged in encouraging voter responsibility in the communities we live in.

Statistics year after year have shown us how a small minority of registered voters are the ones actually making the decisions that drive the future of our country and its leadership.

It’s important, however, for us to keep our patriotic and political beliefs separate and distinct. This isn’t a call to rally behind a particular candidate or issue and leverage Scouting to help carry the day at the polls.

This is a call on our adult Scouters to exercise their right under the Constitution to speak their minds about the future leaders of this country, and do it through the ballot box.

Our society has really gotten away from understanding and embracing the cost of freedom. There’s a huge need for involvement in making decisions on Election Day.

If you’re looking for a license to complain, you need look no farther than your “I voted” sticker.

Thanks,

Bob